September282014
“Your only responsibility as a writer is to be true to the story that has chosen you as its writer.” Jean Little (via maxkirin)
9PM
“I don’t write fantasy; I write historical novels about an imaginary place.” Raymond E. Feist (via maxkirin)
9PM
amandaonwriting:

Writing Quote – William Makepeace Thackeray

amandaonwriting:

Writing Quote – William Makepeace Thackeray

9PM

At the end of each day, I write an “atomic sentence,” a single statement that summarizes the most vital lesson about that day.

At times where I flail, fumble, and otherwise seek a signpost, these sentences have helped — personal lifelines indicating a larger story. Each day, an atomic unit in a living network.

I love Liz Danzico's idea of ending each day with an “atomic sentence,” inspired by Richard Feynman’s one sentence to be passed on to the next generation.  (via explore-blog)
9PM

How to Write Naturally

fictionwritingtips:

Trying to figure out what your style is isn’t as hard as it might seem. I’ve seen a lot of writers get asked questions like “how did you develop as a writer?” or “how did you find your style”, so I feel like this is a topic I should talk about. If you stop stressing out about it, it will all happen naturally. If you continue to read and develop your craft, your style will continue to form.

The styles that writers develop are usually not planned. Most people don’t sit down and think “well, who do I want to sound like?” It’s true that you could be influenced by writers you admire or read a lot of, but it’s not usually a conscious decision. A writer’s style develops naturally over time. It comes from writing A LOT.

If you write a lot and spend time working on your craft, a style will develop on its own. Forcing a style, however, will usually not work. If you force vocabulary you wouldn’t normally use into your writing, your readers will be able to tell.  If you try to mimic your favorite authors, your writing will feel unnatural. Don’t force a style that isn’t yours because you will not produce your best work.  I know it might seem like a good idea to emulate a writing style that is popular, but that’s not the best way to go.

Ultimately, you should use words that feel natural to you and write every day. Try to be clear and concise with your writing. Growing and seeing your writing style change over time is normal, as long as you keep working on improving. Also, try not to compare your writing to someone else’s. Just because you don’t write like Mark Twain, that doesn’t mean you’re not any good. Writing styles are different and it’s hard to compare them.

Here are a few natural ways to develop your own writing style:

Consume what inspires you

Once you figure out what you like and what motivates you, keep going. Reading a lot will help you develop your style and pick out what inspires your own writing. I’m not saying you should mimic what you like, but you will pick up bits and pieces of the novels you’re consuming. That’s not a bad thing. If you consume what you like to read, you’ll find more inspiration for your own novels. What you like will start to creep into your writing.

Try to write different genres

Make sure you experiment to figure out what you’re best at. Write a lot and try writing in different genres and art forms. You might be able to tap into something that you didn’t even know inspires you until you try it. Don’t be afraid to try something new.

Be concise

Don’t dance around what you want to say, just say it. Try figuring out how to get the point faster without bogging down your writing with unnecessary information. This will help you develop a style that will make your writing more appealing. Think about what you want to say and figure out the best way to say it.

-Kris Noel

8PM
“I slid a page into the typewriter and without pausing, I proceeded to squeeze out everything I had inside me. I quarreled with every word, every phrase and expression, every image and letter as if they were the last I was ever going to write. I wrote and rewrote every line as if my life depended on it, and then rewrote it again.” Carlos Ruiz Zafon, The Angel’s Game (via mwanzotena)

(Source: kuwazaidi, via teachingliteracy)

8PM
“Anyone who writes down to children is simply wasting his time. You have to write up, not down. Children are demanding. They are the most attentive, curious, eager, observant, sensitive, quick, and generally congenial readers on earth…. Children are game for anything. I throw them hard words and they backhand them across the net.” E.B. White (via maxkirin)
8PM
aseaofquotes:

Philippe Claudel, Brodeck

aseaofquotes:

Philippe Claudel, Brodeck

(via teachingliteracy)

8PM
“Make the words yours. If your eyes could speak, what would they say?” Markus Zusak, The Book Thief (via maxkirin)
8PM
“Be passionate about what you write, believe in your ability to convey timeless ideas, and let no one tell you what what you’re capable of.” Christina Westover (via maxkirin)
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