July222014
7PM
dglsplsblg:

thinksquad:

A British company has produced a “strange, alien” material so black that it absorbs all but 0.035 per cent of visual light, setting a new world record. To stare at the “super black” coating made of carbon nanotubes – each 10,000 times thinner than a human hair – is an odd experience. It is so dark that the human eye cannot understand what it is seeing. Shapes and contours are lost, leaving nothing but an apparent abyss.
If it was used to make one of Chanel’s little black dresses, the wearer’s head and limbs might appear to float incorporeally around a dress-shaped hole.
Actual applications are more serious, enabling astronomical cameras, telescopes and infrared scanning systems to function more effectively. Then there are the military uses that the material’s maker, Surrey NanoSystems, is not allowed to discuss.
The nanotube material, named Vantablack, has been grown on sheets of aluminium foil by the Newhaven-based company. While the sheets may be crumpled into miniature hills and valleys, this landscape disappears on areas covered by it.
"You expect to see the hills and all you can see … it’s like black, like a hole, like there’s nothing there. It just looks so strange," said Ben Jensen, the firm’s chief technical officer.
Asked about the prospect of a little black dress, he said it would be “very expensive” – the cost of the material is one of the things he was unable to reveal.
"You would lose all features of the dress. It would just be something black passing through," he said.
Vantablack, which was described in the journal Optics Express and will be launched at the Farnborough International Airshow this week, works by packing together a field of nanotubes, like incredibly thin drinking straws. These are so tiny that light particles cannot get into them, although they can pass into the gaps between. Once there, however, all but a tiny remnant of the light bounces around until it is absorbed.
Vantablack’s practical uses include calibrating cameras used to take photographs of the oldest objects in the universe. This has to be done by pointing the camera at something as black as possible.
It also has “virtually undetectable levels of outgassing and particle fallout”, which can contaminate the most sensitive imaging systems. The material conducts heat seven and a half times more effectively than copper and has 10 times the tensile strength of steel.
Stephen Westland, professor of colour science and technology at Leeds University, said traditional black was actually a colour of light and scientists were now pushing it to something out of this world.
"Many people think black is the absence of light. I totally disagree with that. Unless you are looking at a black hole, nobody has actually seen something which has no light," he said. "These new materials, they are pretty much as black as we can get, almost as close to a black hole as we could imagine."
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/blackest-is-the-new-black-scientists-have-developed-a-material-so-dark-that-you-cant-see-it-9602504.html

o…k…?

dglsplsblg:

thinksquad:

A British company has produced a “strange, alien” material so black that it absorbs all but 0.035 per cent of visual light, setting a new world record. To stare at the “super black” coating made of carbon nanotubes – each 10,000 times thinner than a human hair – is an odd experience. It is so dark that the human eye cannot understand what it is seeing. Shapes and contours are lost, leaving nothing but an apparent abyss.

If it was used to make one of Chanel’s little black dresses, the wearer’s head and limbs might appear to float incorporeally around a dress-shaped hole.

Actual applications are more serious, enabling astronomical cameras, telescopes and infrared scanning systems to function more effectively. Then there are the military uses that the material’s maker, Surrey NanoSystems, is not allowed to discuss.

The nanotube material, named Vantablack, has been grown on sheets of aluminium foil by the Newhaven-based company. While the sheets may be crumpled into miniature hills and valleys, this landscape disappears on areas covered by it.

"You expect to see the hills and all you can see … it’s like black, like a hole, like there’s nothing there. It just looks so strange," said Ben Jensen, the firm’s chief technical officer.

Asked about the prospect of a little black dress, he said it would be “very expensive” – the cost of the material is one of the things he was unable to reveal.

"You would lose all features of the dress. It would just be something black passing through," he said.

Vantablack, which was described in the journal Optics Express and will be launched at the Farnborough International Airshow this week, works by packing together a field of nanotubes, like incredibly thin drinking straws. These are so tiny that light particles cannot get into them, although they can pass into the gaps between. Once there, however, all but a tiny remnant of the light bounces around until it is absorbed.

Vantablack’s practical uses include calibrating cameras used to take photographs of the oldest objects in the universe. This has to be done by pointing the camera at something as black as possible.

It also has “virtually undetectable levels of outgassing and particle fallout”, which can contaminate the most sensitive imaging systems. The material conducts heat seven and a half times more effectively than copper and has 10 times the tensile strength of steel.

Stephen Westland, professor of colour science and technology at Leeds University, said traditional black was actually a colour of light and scientists were now pushing it to something out of this world.

"Many people think black is the absence of light. I totally disagree with that. Unless you are looking at a black hole, nobody has actually seen something which has no light," he said. "These new materials, they are pretty much as black as we can get, almost as close to a black hole as we could imagine."

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/blackest-is-the-new-black-scientists-have-developed-a-material-so-dark-that-you-cant-see-it-9602504.html

o…k…?

(via thecraftychemist)

7PM
cenchempics:

SENSORS
Different combinations of thermochromic cholesteryl ester liquid crystals change colors at different temperatures because of the selective reflection of a specific wavelength of visible light from their structure. Such preparations are used in plastic strip thermometers to check the temperature in fish tanks, in refrigerators, and even on your forehead in the case of a fever. These vials were prepared by lab technician Andres Tretiakov for a class demonstration on liquid crystals at St. Paul’s School in London. 
Submitted by: Andres Tretiakov
Related C&EN Stories:
Liquid Crystal Shines In Three Colors

cenchempics:

SENSORS

Different combinations of thermochromic cholesteryl ester liquid crystals change colors at different temperatures because of the selective reflection of a specific wavelength of visible light from their structure. Such preparations are used in plastic strip thermometers to check the temperature in fish tanks, in refrigerators, and even on your forehead in the case of a fever. These vials were prepared by lab technician Andres Tretiakov for a class demonstration on liquid crystals at St. Paul’s School in London.

Submitted by: Andres Tretiakov

Related C&EN Stories:

Liquid Crystal Shines In Three Colors

(via thecraftychemist)

7PM
7PM

txchnologist:

A Wall Becomes A Collaborative Space

Korean researchers are fine-tuning a display system that could upgrade collaborative work and play. The TransWall, being built at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology’s Design Media Lab, is a two-sided see-through touchscreen. It allows people to interact with it and each other, and provides audio and tactile feedback to users.

TransWall works through two projectors on each side of the device that produce images on a holographic screen film, which is sandwiched between two transparent acrylic sheets. A surface transducer attached to the displays makes the screens interactive. Its developers say the system is meant to facilitate interpersonal communication and gaming. See the full video below.

Read More

7PM
vegan-yums:




Vegan Classic Apple Hand-Pies / Recipe

vegan-yums:

Vegan Classic Apple Hand-Pies / Recipe

recipe 

7PM

mymodernmet:

The Abyss Table is a stunning coffee table that mimics the depths of the ocean with stacked layers of wood and glass. Made by London-based furniture design company Duffy London, the limited-edition piece comes with the hefty price tag of £5,800 (nearly $10,000).

(via writersyoga)

7PM
“Travel takes control away from us, exposing our weakest points. We are acutely aware of our vulnerability. We are naive, unaccustomed, unacquainted, unversed. We are ignorant, roaming in the darkness of the unfamiliar. We are lonely, lost, disoriented. Travel pushes us across the chasm. We are moved to explore the mysterious, to confront our fear, to venture beyond the challenging, cryptic crevasses of our path.” Steve Zikman (via emotional-algebra)

(via emotional-algebra)

quote 

7PM

lolitaintheskywithdiamonds:

lamp from the interior’s section of Victoria Maiden

(via lemon-cream)

gimme 

7PM
vegan-yums:

Vanilla Cupcakes with Raspberry Buttercream / Recipe

vegan-yums:

Vanilla Cupcakes with Raspberry Buttercream / Recipe

recipe